Far-right AfD now the second most popular party in Germany: poll

AfD federal chairman Jörg Meuthen. Photo: DPA

 

A poll published on Monday by the newspaper Bild put the Alternative for Germany (AfD) on 16 percent, showing that they are currently more popular than the Social Democrats (SPD).

The poll, conducted by INSA put the AfD on 16 percent, just ahead of the SPD on 15.5 percent. The poll marks the lowest support ever achieved by the SPD, traditionally one of the two major parties of German politics.

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Germany: Meet Jens Spahn, Merkel’s Possible Successor

Pictured: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right) and Jens Spahn (left), a top contender for succeeding Merkel as leader of the CDU party. (Photo by Volker Hartmann/Getty Images)

 

“I am a burkaphobe.”

  • “What is clear at any rate: the financing [of imams] by foreign actors must stop.” — Jens Spahn, Deutsche Welle.
  • “The message that ‘If you reach a Greek island, you will be in Germany in six days,’ not only encourages refugees from Syria, but also many people in Bangladesh and India. No country in the world, and no European Union, can withstand that if we give up control of our external borders.” — Jens Spahn, Die Zeit.
  • To anyone who makes their way to Germany, it must made be clear that their life here will be very different from that at home. They should think carefully about whether they really want to live in this western culture.” — Die Welt.

Chancellor Angela Merkel has sparked a mutiny from within her own party over a controversial coalition deal that allows her to remain in office for a fourth term. The deal, in which Merkel agreed to relinquish control over the most influential government ministries, has led a growing number of voices from within her Christian Democratic Union (CDU) to say — publicly — that it is time to begin looking for her successor. Continue reading

NATO’s Real Existential Threat: The Surrender of Western Values

 

The alliance’s elites have come down with a case of civilizational cluelessness

On January 17, Petr Pavel, a Czech army general and NATO’s military committee chairman, led meetings with his counterparts from Ukraine and Georgia, which he tweeted were “Sessions dedicated to Projecting Stability.” Yet while NATO’s collaboration with nations historically intertwined with Russia could lead to a number of possible outcomes, “stability” seems the least likely one. Like so much of what the alliance does, the purpose of these meetings is to push the alliance ever eastward.

That raises a question. Why should Americans participate in an alliance in which a general—from a minuscule military power that spends 1 percent of its GDP on defense—hosts a meeting that is more likely to provoke a catastrophic U.S.-Russia war than to prevent one? As Ted Galen Carpenter recently explained here at TAC, this is the dangerous calculus that results from interlocking the United States with so many NATO nations, including some that Moscow regards as within its sphere of influence.

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Germany is the leading breaker of EU rules

06 Rules, moi-01

 

No other country seems to lecture EU states as much as Germany. But, embarrassingly, Angela Merkel’s government is in breach of European regulations more than anyone else.

Yes, it’s really true: Germany is the top rule breaker in the European Union. The country, which has lectured debt sinners like Greece, performs worst in complying with European Union legislation. Physician, heal thyself. Continue reading

With Japan against China

 

TOKYO/BRUSSELS/BERLIN(Own report) – With the conclusion of their free trade agreement, the EU and Japan are about to establish the world’s largest free trade zone. As was reported, the agreement between the two highly export oriented economic blocks, generating nearly 30 percent of the global economic output, could already take effect in early 2019. According to the EU Commission and German economic institutes the Japan-EU Free Trade Agreement (JEFTA) could lead to significant economic growth and the creation of hundreds of thousands of new jobs. On the one hand, the agreement is aimed at making up for eventual slumps on the US market and, on the other, is part of the containment strategy against China, the emerging powerhouse. Despite their differences, Berlin and Washington continue to cooperate in their opposition to Beijing. Parallel to the JEFTA agreement, the EU, Japan and the USA have declared that they will jointly take on China more aggressively over trade issues.

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Far right enters government in Austria

The last time the far right got into power in Austria, EU and Israel froze relations (Photo: oevp.at)

 

Austria’s new government has pledged support for the EU, but aims to give a hard time to refugees and to be friendlier to Russia.

The policy lines emerged on Sunday (17 December) in a coalition deal between the centre-right Austrian People’s Party (OVP) and the far-right Freedom Party (FPO).

The pact is to see the OVP’s 31-year old Sebastian Kurz become Austria’s youngest-ever leader, with the FPO’s Heinz-Christian Strache as deputy. Continue reading

Macron and Merkel take tough line on Poland

‘If the commission considers it is forced to resort to sanctions, we would also support the commission,’ Macron and Merkel said. (Photo: Consilium)

 

France and Germany have pledged to back the European Commission if it sanctioned Poland next week.

“If the commission thinks it has to trigger the [sanctions] procedure, we have a very clear and consistent position – we’ll support the commission,” French president Emmanuel Macron said in Brussels on Friday (15 December).

German chancellor Angela Merkel said: “If the commission considers it is forced to resort [to sanctions], we would also support the commission”.

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Who Leads the West and Why: Trump or Merkel? Constitutional Cultures in the United States and Germany

Theodor Fontane, the master of German realist fiction, published his first novel, Before the Storm, in 1876. Set during the winter of 1812–13, in and around Berlin, it explores the decisive historical moment when Prussia changed sides—breaking out of its forced alliance with France in order to side with Russia in the anti-Napoleonic war. Yet the dialectic of the moment was such that Germans could join in the rout of the French while nonetheless embracing aspects of the French revolutionary legacy. Thus near the conclusion of the novel, the Prussian General von Bamme, commenting on social changes around him, a reduction in traditional structures of hierarchy, speculates, “And where does all this come from? From over yonder, borne on the west wind. I can make nothing of these windbags of Frenchmen, but in all the rubbish they talk there is none the less a pinch of wisdom. Nothing much is going to come of their Fraternity, nor of their Liberty: but there is something to be said for what they have put between them. For what, after all, does it mean but: a man is a man.”[1]Mensch ist mensch. Continue reading

Germany Enters Dangerous, Uncharted Waters

 

After weeks of tottering on the edge, Germany this week fell into full-blown political crisis.

On Sunday, the Free Democrats pulled out of discussions to form a coalition government. This caused the four-party negotiations to collapse.

Germany is in uncharted waters politically. This situation is unprecedented. The nation hasn’t experienced this much ambiguity and political instability since the Weimar years of the 1920s.

Der Spiegel wrote this week that this “is an unprecedented moment of uncertainty for a country that prizes stability and predictability above all else.” It is also reported that it is “difficult to overstate the impact of the collapsed talks.” Continue reading

The Political Crisis in Germany Changes the Game

 

Merkel faces the worst crisis of her career and many behind the curtain are starting to wonder if she will even survive. The German Federal President Steinmeier could not actually order new elections immediately. The procedure in this regard is quite complicated in Germany. The earliest possible alternative would be to hold new elections come the spring of 2018. It is likely that the AFD is likely to gather even greater support from new elections. Nonetheless, the CDU will continue to support Merkel at least right now. However, the CDU has been severely weakened by the election and if we do not see new elections until the spring, there is a distinct possibility that Merkel’s support even within the CDU could collapse if they see the AfD will win even greater support. Continue reading

Erdogan Rejects NATO Apology: “There Can Be No Alliance Like That”

Turkey’s megalomaniac is out shopping for excuses to turn on NATO and join the China-Russia axis… which eventually will happen.

 

 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is refusing to let NATO off the hook for an inadvertent yet insulting gesture that prompted him to remove 40 Turkish troops from a joint military exercise in Norway.

Russia Today reports that Erdogan has rebuffed a NATO apology for what he called “impudence” after his name was included on an “enemies chart” shared with military officials participating in the exercises. Erdogan’s name was reportedly included alongside a photo of Turkish founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Continue reading

Merkel in chaos: Germany without government SEVEN WEEKS after Chancellor’s election disaster

Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel hopes to get preliminary talks out of the way be the end of the week [EPA]

 

GERMAN leader Angela Merkel is yet to form a government seven weeks after the country went to the polls.

Voters went to the polls on September 24 in an embarassing election for Mrs Merkel’s conservatives who bled support to the far right.

If coalition talks stall Berlin would face a lengthy period of uncertainty at a time when many in the European Union are looking to Germany for leadership on issues ranging from euro zone governance to trans-Atlantic relations. Continue reading

‘Czech Donald Trump’ wins in landslide: ‘Refugees should behave as guests’

Czech billionaire Andrej Babis and his wife Monika. / AFP / Getty Images

 

A populist billionaire often referred to as the “Czech Donald Trump” is set to be the next prime minister of the Czech Republic.

Babis has been an outspoken critic of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s open-door migration policy.

“I will not accept refugee quotas for the Czech Republic,” Babis said. Continue reading

Visegrad Group: EU Must Reform or Risk Breaking Up

 

The Visegrad Group (V4), made up of Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, has hit out at the European Union saying it must reform to reflect the wishes of all Member States, or risk breaking up completely. Continue reading

Austria election RESULTS: Eurosceptic Sebastian Kurz declares VICTORY in nightmare for EU

As stated over and over again, Europe is going to take a far right swing. All it needed was a catalyst and the immigration issue has proved to be one, along with islamic terrorist attacks and Germany’s fourth power grab for Europe.

 

Sebastian Kurz arrives with his partner ahead of the elections

Sebastian Kurz arrives with his partner ahead of the elections (Getty)

 

SEBASTIAN Kurz has declared victory in the Austrian elections following the latest vote projections, which could see him form an alliance with the far-right in a crushing blow for the European Union.

The People’s Party (OVP) got 30.2 per cent of the vote, according to exit polls from Austrian news channel ORF.

Mr Kurz’s party is tough on migration, easy on taxes and widely Eurosceptic after rebranding itself over the last few months to propel its popularity in the wealthy Alpine nation. Continue reading