Russian Official Cancels U.S. Visit, Saying ‘Second American Civil War’ Is Underway

https://s.newsweek.com/sites/www.newsweek.com/files/styles/embed_tablet/public/2019/01/10/gettyimages-810825414.jpg

Activists and protesters gesture at a man wearing a confederate flag before a Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, July 8, 2017. Such clashes in the same city would turn deadly one month later when a white supremacist killed a protester with his vehicles, sparking nationwide tensions only further stoked by President Donald Trump’s polarizing response. (ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images )

 

Dmitry Rogozin, the head of Russia’s Roscosmos State Space Corporation, who served as deputy prime minister until May 2017, said Thursday that rising tensions between Republicans and Democrats were leading to a breakdown of U.S. society. This included the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), one of many federal agencies affected by a government shutdown due to an inability for the rival U.S. parties to agree on funding for a border wall proposed by President Donald Trump.

“I think that America is actually engulfed by its second civil war now,” Rogozin told the Rossiya-24 TV channel, as translated by the state-run Tass Russian News Agency. Continue reading

Can a Divided America Survive?

Torn sign at a pro-Trump rally in Portland, Ore., June 4, 2017. (Reuters photo: David Ryder)

 

History has not been very kind to countries that enter a state of multicultural chaos.

The United States is currently the world’s oldest democracy.

But America is no more immune from collapse than were some of history’s most stable and impressive consensual governments. Fifth-century Athens, Republican Rome, Renaissance Florence and Venice, and many of the elected governments of early 20th-century Western European states eventually destroyed themselves, went bankrupt, or were overrun by invaders. Continue reading

America is due for a revolution

Here’s the good news: The chaos and upheaval we see all around us have historical precedents and yet America survived. The bad news: Everything likely will get worse before it gets better again.

That’s my chief takeaway from “Shattered Consensus,” a meticulously argued analysis of the growing disorder. Author James Piereson persuasively makes the case there is an inevitable “revolution” coming because our politics, culture, education, economics and even philanthropy are so polarized that the country can no longer resolve its differences.

Piereson describes the endgame this way: “The problems will mount to a point of crisis where either they will be addressed through a ‘fourth revolution’ or the polity will begin to disintegrate for lack of fundamental agreement.” Continue reading