Obama administration approved green cards for Iran MPs

The barbarians are not at the gate. The barbarians are in the within the gates and the red carpet has been rolled out for them.

 

NICOSIA — The administration of President Barack Obama has quietly approved permanent residence status to Iranian officials and parliamentarians.

Iranian parliamentarians have reported that scores of senior Teheran regime representatives were issued documents that allowed them to live and work in the United States. They said some of the Iranians also acquired U.S. citizenship.

The letter by the parliamentarians, most linked to opponents of President Hassan Rowhani, did not identify the Iranians provided citizenship or so-called Green Cards, Middle East Newsline reported. But the Iranian media said the letter referred to Rowhani’s chief of staff, Mohammed Nahavandian, educated in the United States and said to have obtained a Green Card in 1993. Continue reading

Taxes Prompt More Americans to Renounce Citizenship

“Your options are to ignore the IRS and stick your head in the sand; take your name off of all the accounts and live in a completely cash economy; divorce; or renounce U.S. citizenship,” Laederich says. “We’ve seen all of these things happen.”

Genette Eysselinck, a friend of Laederich’s, renounced early this year. Her husband, a European Union civil servant, saw no good reason to share his account information with the IRS, she says. And after considering all her options, Eysselinck decided that renouncing was the best path.

“It created a lot of tensions around here,” she says. “Divorce seemed a little extreme, so I asked myself, ‘What am I gaining as an American?’ And the cons outweighed the pros.”

Eysselinck was born in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and says she grew up on military bases all over the world. Her father, she says, was an Air Force pilot. Eysselinck has lived abroad for decades and no longer has any close connections in the United States.

She spent her final months as an American collecting paperwork and filing tax returns from the past five years, even though she says she owed nothing. Her last act as a citizen was to swear before an American flag that she renounced all ties with the United States. She called the process “gut wrenching.”

“I grew up in a military family where patriotic feeling was very strong” Eysselinck says. “I’m amazed at how terrible I felt renouncing. But it was the only way to get them off my back. It’s very distressing and time consuming to keep up with all the paperwork. But if it’s this bad when I’m 64, how bad will it be when I’m 74?”

Full article: Taxes Prompt More Americans to Renounce Citizenship (CNBC)