Why Does the Catholic Church Organize Europe’s Largest Nazi Rally?

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Participants with Croatian flags attend a commemoration rally at the Loibacher Feld in Bleiburg, Austria, on May 12. (GERT EGGENBERGER/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Last weekend, around 10,000 people gathered in a field near the town of Bleiburg in southern Austria for what the Documentation Centre of Austrian Resistance calls the “largest regular neo-Nazi rally” in Europe. Hitler salutes, racist flags and slogans were common. Kids ran around with fascist slogans on their T-shirts. Featured guests gave speeches defending fascism.

Efraim Zuroff, the Eastern Europe director for the Simon Wiesenthal Center, called the event “an affront to the memory of Holocaust victims.”

But the most surprising part of this event may be the identity of its organizer: the Croatian Bishops’ Conference of the Catholic Church.

What is the Catholic Church doing organizing a neo-Nazi rally? A look at history points to the answer. Continue reading

What if the Plan Was?

Russia’s central strategic problem is NATO. Russia must break the back of NATO. But how?

Step One, the Arab Spring: The best attack is always an indirect attack. So Russia began its attack on NATO hundreds of miles away, in the Arab world. Revolution is the perfect strategy for a country like Russia, which is rich in clandestine and criminal resources. (In Egypt’s revolution, for example, the first flags raised in protest were red. The green flags only came out afterward.) The Arab Spring revolutions were calculated to shake things up. Islamist and communist forces were initially linked, arm-in-arm. If they failed to get power, the resulting chaos would nonetheless serve other purposes. For example, the civil war in Syria presents a prime example. The Russians, who dominate the criminal underworld, created the transport net for moving millions of Muslim refugees to the heart of Europe. Russian air units carpet bombed Syrian cities and villages, driving hundreds of thousands out of their homes. Next, they salted the fleeing multitudes with military-age men trained as terrorists. Then Europe was hit by a new wave of terror. Continue reading

Europe’s ‘Underground’ Army

 

To many, Europe today is a military weakling. It has looked this way before—only to shock the world with its strength.

One nation is working “behind the scenes” to bring European armies together. It is swallowing entire armies, and bringing foreign soldiers under its control, without firing a shot.

And this is rarely reported in Western media.

This nation is quietly building a massive new military power in Europe. Continue reading

Europe Will Reap What Spain Has Sown

 

The Spanish government decided to reach back into its history and borrow from the playbook of longtime Spanish fascist dictator Francisco Franco in dealing with Catalonia’s decision to declare independence from the Spanish Kingdom as the Republic of Catalonia. The Catalan government’s decision to declare independence followed an October 1 referendum in the region that resulted in a “yes” for independence. Continue reading

Europe’s Push Toward a Unified Military

The official flag of Eurocorps military contingent (FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

 

As global threats increase, many nations support the idea of an independent and united European military. Here is why we expect it to happen, and where we expect it to lead.

The 100 years between 1815 and when World War i started in 1914 were one of Europe’s greatest periods of peace ever. But that isn’t to say it was peaceful.

Consider what happened during those years: France invaded Spain; Russia fought Turkey; various German states fought with Denmark, Austria and France; Britain and Turkey fought Russia; and Greece fought Turkey. Those are just the “highlights”—and they don’t include the numerous internal conflicts, uprisings, declarations of independence and other political unrest that occurred. Even Switzerland had a civil war.

That is what “peace” in Europe looked like before the latter half of the 20th century.

The states of Europe spent 75 percent of the 17th century at war with each other, 50 percent of the 18th century, and 25 percent of the 19th. The periods of war became shorter—but more than made up for it with devastatingly more effective weapons.

This is why many are skeptical of the creation of a “European army.” How can a continent with such a long history of war and division form a united military force? Continue reading

Germany and Islam

Like any other nation, you will never understand modern day Germany if you don’t learn about its past.

 

Truly scary is that the Bible declared that very Pergamon altar as the throne of Satan.

 

Germany has a bizarre historical connection with Islam that lies beneath much of the present day crisis in Europe. One could argue that these connections are just the product of historical coincidences, but with Germany the coincidences seem to add up regularly.

When one studies the age of European imperialism, Germany came late to the game, almost as an afterthought.  Bismarck, for all his authoritarian faults, felt that imperialism would do Germany no good, and wanted no part of it.  He was overridden by public opinion, and Bismarck’s policy was later repudiated by Kaiser Wilhelm II, who wanted Germany to take her “Place in the Sun.”

Imperialism would not have destroyed Germany, per se; smaller and weaker nations such as Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, and even backward Spain all had empires. Continue reading

Germany’s European Army and an Interview With the Son of Hitler’s Lawyer and Top Nazi

 

In addition to our regular This Week in Germany feature, we want to pass on an exciting announcement: Tomorrow, German journalist and author Niklas Frank will visit our Edstone campus near Stratford-upon-Avon, England. Frank is the son of Hans Frank, the man that Adolf Hitler appointed governor general of Poland during World War ii. Continue reading

Philippines’ Duterte Says He’ll Kill Human Rights Activists. Who’s Next?

Caption: Rodrigo Duterte (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened on Monday to kill human rights activists who criticize his murderous and illegal war on drug dealers and users.

“The human rights [activists] said I ordered the killings,” he said in a speech in Malacañang. “I told them ‘OK. Let’s stop. We’ll let them [drug users] multiply so that when it’s harvest time, more people will die.”

Then he added: “I will include you [in the killing] because you are the reason why their numbers swell.” Continue reading

Germany, Political Crisis and Superman

Germany’s former defense minister, Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, and Chancellor Angela Merkel (Getty Images)

 

Germany’s government, especially Angela Merkel, is proving inadequate. For a leader with the right personality and leadership, this could be a terrific opportunity to seize control of Germany.

Since 1982, the year E.T. the Extra Terrestrial was released and the Falkland War occurred, Germany has had only three chancellors. The United States has had five presidents in that time; Britain six prime ministers; and Italy 15 prime ministers. Even more remarkable: Since the end of World War ii, more than 70 years ago, Germany has had only nine chancellors. That’s an average of eight years per chancellorship. America, in that time, has had 12 presidents, six years per presidency; Britain 15 prime ministers, five years per prime ministership; and Italy 45 prime ministerships, averaging 1.5 years each.

Behind these facts is a fundamental truth: Postwar Germany, perhaps more than any other modern nation, is accustomed to political stability and order.

So what happens if this stable, dependent political system breaks down? History provides some insight. Continue reading

Looking to Charlemagne

The referred to FT article can be found here:

The Holy Roman Empire can help inspire a different European Union

 

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Charlemagne’s legacy is providing inspiration for some in Europe. (Mark Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Major media outlets are starting to notice parallels between modern Europe and the Holy Roman Empire. Are these similarities to be celebrated? Check history.

“The Holy Roman Empire Can Help Inspire a Different European Union.” This was the headline of a January 20 article in the Financial Times of Britain.

Many authorities today believe returning to the ways of the Holy Roman Empire would vastly improve Europe. This reflects a dangerous ignorance of history. Continue reading

Canada’s Military–A Shameful Shadow of Its Once Glorious Past

Caption: Destroyer HMCS Athabaskan (iStock.com/OlegAlbinsky)

 

Canada’s military services can no longer defend the nation’s borders—much less its citizens. According to the new commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, Vice Adm. Ron Lloyd, Canada’s last destroyer, hmcs Athabaskan, will be retired from service in the spring of 2017, leaving the nation to rely on its allies for defense for at least the next seven years. Over the previous decades, Athabaskan and other similar vessels provided the capabilities of command and control for both the Royal Canadian Navy and the area air defense. By next spring, the Navy will be left with only 12 frigates, 12 coast defense vessels and 4 submarines. Canada will need to rely on the United States for its area air defense.

Continue reading

German Politician: Turkey Like Nazi Germany After Reichstag

The leader of Germany’s liberal Free Democrats (FDP) likened Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan’s purge of state institutions to the actions of the Nazi party in the 1930s in comments published on Sunday.

FDP leader Christian Lindner said he saw parallels between Erdogan’s behavior and the aftermath of the Reichstag fire in 1933 portrayed by the Nazis as a Communist plot against the government and used by Adolf Hitler to justify massively curtailing civil liberties. Continue reading

China’s Hundred-Year Strategy

Beijing has a documented plan to be the premier global superpower by 2049. It’s over halfway there. 

Americans think in four-year election cycles. Chinese leaders think in terms of centuries. Just leaf through the glossy, cream-colored, gold-flecked pages of The Governance of China. This anthology of political theories by Chinese President Xi Jinping is considered almost sacred scripture in Beijing.

Across 18 chapters about leading the most populous nation on the planet, Xi outlines his utopian vision for the Chinese people. In the world he describes, the Chinese are heirs to an ancient and unique civilization entitled to a privileged position among nations. In this world, China is an economic, cultural and military superpower, while the United States is no longer a major geopolitical power.

Continue reading

Germany Makes Gains in the Scramble Over Latin America’s Resources

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Latin America’s political shifts are opening doors for Germany’s economy.

Many nations today are casting their gaze upon a land where natural resources are found in abundance, where raw materials are yet to be extracted, and where renewable energy resources haven’t reached their full potential. They are ogling Latin America as a region that could help them secure their economic future.

For a time, China, and to some degree Russia, seemed to gain the upper edge.

But the Trumpet did not expect that arrangement to last. “[B]e assured that Europe will not stand by passively and allow Beijing and Moscow to elbow it off the dance floor,” we wrote last year.

Now, the political landscape in parts of Latin America is changing, which may open the door for greater German involvement. Continue reading

The Unexpected Snake

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Click to learn your lesson.

 

The Farmer and the Snake

A Farmer walked through his field one cold winter morning. On the ground lay a Snake, stiff and frozen with the cold. The Farmer knew how deadly the Snake could be, and yet he picked it up and put it in his bosom to warm it back to life.

The Snake soon revived, and when it had enough strength, bit the man who had been so kind to it. The bite was deadly and the Farmer felt that he must die. “Oh,” cried the Farmer with his last breath, “I am rightly served for pitying a scoundrel.”

The Greatest Kindness Will Not Bind the Ungrateful. Continue reading