The Emerging Trump Doctrine- Defeat Communist China

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The meeting between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin today in Helsinki offers an insight into what might be called the Trump Doctrine.

The common denominator for Mr. Trump’s foreign and trade policies seems to be a determination to isolate and counter Communist China. Continue reading

The Road to War: China vs the US

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In 2016 Steve Bannon, President Donald Trump’s former chief strategist, declared that there was no doubt, in his mind, that the US would go to war with China in the South China Sea in the next five to 10 years.

A US-Chinese military conflict would be on top of a vow by Trump in his inaugural presidential address, to not only take on radical Islamic terrorism but to “eradicate it from the face of the Earth.” This would be done by building up America’s already supreme military. “Our military dominance must be unquestioned,” the billionaire businessman, who now controlled the most powerful political office in the world, declared in his first address to the nation.

A year and a half after that speech, the United States is not at war with China, but its economic saber-rattling is arguably the beginning of a confrontation between the world’s largest and second-largest economies. Trump’s tariff threats against not only China but Europe, Canada, Mexico and its other trade partners, are also symbolic of a shift in US foreign policy towards a more isolationist stance – one that may not strictly be due to Trump’s belligerent personality. This article will get into the antecedents of this economic and military showdown and point the way to some possible future scenarios, including a war in space. Continue reading

Trump Calls the European Union a Foe: ‘What They Do to Us in Trade’

 

President Donald Trump said during a Sunday interview with CBS News anchor Jeff Glor that the European Union is a foe.

“What’s your biggest competitor, the biggest foe globally right now?” Glor asked the president

“Well, I think we have a lot of foes. I think the European Union is a foe, what they do to us in trade,” Trump said. “Now, you wouldn’t think of the European Union, but they’re a foe.” Continue reading

President Trump Sends NATO Into Meltdown

Note: Please see the video at the source.

 

After threatening to walk away from the alliance over spending issues, he claims the other members have agreed to his demand during an emergency meeting.

After hinting that the U.S. might withdraw from the alliance if NATO’s members won’t adhere to their commitment to spending requirements, President Donald Trump sent the heads of state from all 29 member countries scrambling into emergency session—after which he emerged claiming a new victory.

The president got the ball rolling on the final day of the NATO summit in Brussels by tweeting:

“What good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy? Why are there only 5 out of 29 countries that have met their commitment? The U.S. is paying for Europe’s protection, then loses billions on Trade. Must pay 2% of GDP IMMEDIATELY, not by 2025.” Continue reading

Turkey “has become extremely hostile to NATO”

 

Center President and CEO, Frank Gaffney, joins Lars Larson to discuss NATO, Turkey and the House IT scandal. Continue reading

Germans Actually Want US Troops Out Of Germany, Poll Finds

While Donald Trump is 100% correct on Germany being controlled by Russia, it’s not a 100% influence over Germany… and he’s also unwittingly helping someone else fill in the vacuum of a post-American-protected Europe. Europeans have already longed for the day American troops leave Europe, long before this poll ever came out. The question is who will fill that vacuum. The likely answer is a European Army replacing NATO, which is already Under Construction as we speak.

There may be partnerships going on between Europe and Russia, but Europe, militarily speaking, understands the need for its own independent defense mechanism and still feels threatened by Russia despite energy and business deals. Moreover, this is not necessarily something thought of by EU members as a whole, but Germany. Germany is the powerhouse of the EU and has always had ambitions to take Europe — even in this new generation. It dictates its policy and those who don’t follow end up being vassal states like Greece and Cyprus. Although harder to push around, Italy is the next target for the chopping block after the election of an anti-EU leadership. This is Germany’s way of getting member states in sync.

The creation of a new superpower is underway, all lead by Berlin’s Fourth Reich. If you’re still looking for Nazis, you’re 70 years too late. The game plan has changed, but the goal remains the same: A multi-national United States of Europe with its own European Army.

 

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Map source: Wikimedia Commons

 

A central irony behind Trump’s rumored “threat” that he could withdraw or at least greatly reduce American troops stationed in Germany, who last month wrote to Angela Merkel of “growing frustration in the United States that some allies have not stepped up as promised” on defense spending, is that Germans don’t actually want US troops on their soil to begin with, according to a new poll. Continue reading

Trump: ‘Germany Is Totally Controlled by Russia’

 

President Donald Trump shared on Twitter Wednesday a video of sharp words he directed toward NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg about Germany being “totally controlled by Russia” regarding their energy relationship.

“Germany, as far as I’m concerned, is captive to Russia because it’s getting so much of its energy from Russia,” Trump told Stoltenberg at a bilateral breakfast ahead of the NATO summit in Brussels, Belgium. Continue reading

Russia’s Supersonic Bombers To Launch Hypersonic Missiles

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This could be problematic for the Americans, as Air Force Gen. John Hyten, commander of U.S. Strategic Command, recently warned the Senate Armed Services Committee that the U.S. is extremely vulnerable to future attack via hypersonic threats. Hyten even stressed we [U.S.] are falling behind in the technological know-how to defend the homeland from the danger, as Russia advances its hypersonic program.

While the Americans are behind the hypersonic curve, Russia has spent the last six months air-launching the Kinzhal hypersonic missile from the Mikoyan MiG-31 supersonic interceptor aircraft. Continue reading

Europe Cannot Cope With Any Further Armed Conflict On The Continent

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European leaders are not only unable to counteract the demographic crisis on the Old Continent, but are also losing ground in terms of defense. President Trump’s skepticism and reservation about the military ideas of European bureaucrats, Ankara’s increasingly aggressive actions towards Cyprus and Greece, and the rapprochement between Turkey and Russia highlight NATO’s weakness on the eve of its summit in Brussels.

Europe stands no chance if forced to face conflict on three fronts. Two of them are of conventional character: on the eastern flank, where there are continuous tensions with Russia, and in the Balkans near the border with Turkey. The third concerns the Mediterranean area, where young and strong men from Africa and Central Asia cross European borders with the support of a thousand people from the continent’s heartland. Europeans are also militarily involved in Afghanistan, Syria and take part in the growing conflict in Mali. Continue reading

Meyssan: What Donald Trump Is Preparing

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When the backwash from the blades of the Presidential helicopter blew a Marine guard’s cap off, Donald Trump picked it up and put it back on his head.

 

After having observed Donald Trump’s historical references (the constitutional compromise of 1789, the examples of Andrew Jackson and Richard Nixon) and the way in which his partisans perceive his politics, Thierry Meyssan here analyses his anti-imperialist actions. The US President is not interested in taking a step back, but on the contrary, abandoning the interests of the transnational ruling class in order to develop the US national economy.

The problem

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Is Turkey Playing a Double Game with NATO?

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Pictured: A Russian S-400 missile battery. (Image source: Vitaly Kuzmin/Wikimedia Commons)

 

  • Why would Turkey first order a Russian defense system and then turn around and make a cooperation agreement with Europe for the same purpose?
  • This goes back to America’s apprehension that if Turkey uses the S-400s along with the U.S. F-35s, Russia could gain access to information about the aircraft’s sensitive technology.
  • If Turkey is playing a double game with NATO, let us hope that the United States does not fall prey to it.

In January, 2018 Turkey reportedly awarded an 18-month contract for a study on the development and production of a long-range air- and missile-defense system to France and Italy, showing — ostensibly — Turkey’s ongoing commitment to NATO. The study, contracted between the EUROSAM consortium and Turkey’s Aselsan and Roketsan companies, was agreed upon in Paris, on the sidelines of a meeting between French President Emmanuel Macron and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Continue reading

Britain’s Navy at Half Strength

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iStock.com/Alan_Lagadu

 

Britain now has fewer than half of the naval vessels it had in 1990, the Telegraph reported on June 21. In that time, there has been a 60 percent decrease in the number of submarines, frigates and destroyers in the Royal Navy, according to a 2013 Ministry of Defense report. The service had two aircraft carriers in 1990: It currently has zero.

Britain’s defense budget has decreased dramatically. Today, Britain’s military spending is a little over half of what it was 25 years ago. Its defense spending has decreased from a Cold War high of 3.8 percent of its gross domestic product to only 2.2 percent, just above the nato minimum.

Despite keeping its nato commitment, Britain has lost its naval supremacy and is “at a historic ebb in firepower,” according to National Interest.

Britain does not recognize the need to maintain its defenses against military threats. Instead, it prioritized funding for foreign aid, the National Health Service and other domestic welfare programs. In the past, health, education and defense spending were equal. But expenditures in these non-defense areas have roughly doubled since 1990. Today, Britain spends almost six times more taxpayer cash on welfare than it does on defense. Continue reading

More Countries Start Exploring Alternatives to the US World Order

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There are two countries that more than others show how the Western world order is undergoing a profound change. Japan and Turkey occupy two distinct and diverse geographical areas, yet they share many of the same strategic choices about their future. Their geopolitical trajectory is increasingly drifting away from Washington and moving closer to China, Russia, India and Iran.

Both Japan and Turkey are two important states in the US’s strategy for controlling the Middle East and Asia-Pacific. Both countries have economies that are competitive in comparison to their neighbors, and both often conveniently find themselves allied to countries within Washington’s orbit. Japan has a good relationship with South Korea, and Turkey (until a few years ago) had a privileged relationship with Saudi Arabia and Israel. Keeping in mind that the US aims to prolong and consolidate its regional dominance, Washington has always tried to have excellent relations with these two countries as a way of ensuring its constant presence in regional affairs. Continue reading

Coalition of Those Willing to Go to War

PARIS/BERLIN (Own report) – Germany is participating in a new European military formation that was launched yesterday. Originally a French proposal, the European Intervention Initiative (EII) will be open to EU and Non-EU member countries to join. Expanding the existing EU military cooperation (“PESCO”) with a new operational component, the EII should facilitate rapid decisions on joint military interventions. A first meeting of military commanders from the hitherto nine participant states is set for September. The EII includes Great Britain, which plans to continue its military cooperation with the continent, even after Brexit, as well as Denmark. Since the coordination of military interventions is now officially set outside of the EU framework, Denmark can sidestep the opt-out from EU military policy, it had once granted its population. Referred to by experts as a European “coalition of the willing,” it goes hand in hand with the EU Commission’s militarization plans worth billions and the high-cost German-French arms projects.

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The European Intervention Initiative: a New Military Force Established in Europe

The European Intervention Initiative: a New Military Force Established in Europe

 

The predictions have come true about the emergence of a new defense group that will change the European security environment. On June 25, the defense chiefs from nine EU countries signed off on the creation of a new force called the European Intervention Initiative (EII), which is spearheaded by French President Emmanuel Macron. The new organization will have a common budget and a doctrine establishing its guidelines for acting and joint planning for contingencies in which NATO may not get involved. The group includes the UK, Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium, Estonia, Spain, and Portugal. Italy may join soon. The initiative is not tied to the EU’s Common European Defense, which includes the PESCO agreement as well as NATO. Great Britain has always opposed the idea of creating a European defense alliance, fearing it would undermine transatlantic unity. Now it has done an about-face, as the rifts within the US grow deeper. Continue reading