Laser beams apparently aimed at U.S. military aircraft in Okinawa near Futenma

Laser-like rays were beamed at U.S. military aircraft flying near the Futenma base in Okinawa five times since July 2014, an official with the U.S. Marine Corps said. Continue reading

Chinese bomber exercise affirms air-defence identification zone, penetrates Second Island Chain

An unusually large People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) formation of eight bombers supported by three surveillance and electronic intelligence (ELINT) aircraft exercised over the East China Sea on 27 November before flying a long distance inside the Second Island Chain. Continue reading

‘Large’ Chinese Military Fleet Flies Near Japan Islands: Reports

Tokyo:  Japan scrambled jets after 11 Chinese military planes flew near southern Japanese islands during what Beijing said was a drill to improve its long-range combat abilities, reports said Saturday.

The planes — eight bombers, two intelligence gathering planes and one early-warning aircraft — flew near Miyako and Okinawa on Friday without violating Japan’s airspace, the Japanese defence ministry said in a statement released on Friday. Continue reading

Chinese yuan likely to be added to IMF special basket of currencies

China hopes stamp of approval will improve yuan’s desirability among investors and undermine hegemony of US dollar as global reserve currency

China’s efforts to make the yuan an international currency on a par with the US dollar is to receive a fillip with the International Monetary Fund widely expected to add it to a special basket of global currencies.

Analysts say the shareholders in the Washington-based IMF will vote on Monday to include the yuan, also known as the renminbi, as the fifth member of its special drawing rights currency basket alongside the dollar, the Japanese yen, sterling and the euro.

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Russia adds yuan as currency reserve

The Central Bank of Russia has included the Chinese yuan in its reserve currency basket, TASS reports. The move is expected to boost the yuan’s presence in the Russian financial market.

As of December 31, 2014, the latest data available, the US dollar was still dominating Russia’s forex basket at 44 percent. The second most-used foreign currency was the euro with 42 percent. The British pound made up 9.5 percent. Continue reading

China plans a military base in Djibouti

A small follow-up article from a previous post:


Beijing: China has announced plans to establish its first overseas military outpost in the Horn of Africa nation of Djibouti, amid a sweeping overhaul of its military designed to make the world’s largest army better equipped to project force abroad.

China’s Defence Ministry refrained from calling the new installation a military base, instead saying the construction of “military supporting facilities” would help provide logistical support for Chinese peacekeeping and anti-piracy patrols in the Gulf of Aden. But analysts say the facility has potential to become a platform for operations in Africa and the Middle East. Continue reading

Protective Fukushima Sea Wall Cracking – Reports

Consider this enough proof that the leakage problem is not solved. 10 tons of contaminated water flow is 10 tons too much, and likely is even a purposely understated amount. Other reports in the past have mentioned hundreds of tons leaking out daily and that the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California is turning into a dead zone.


The barrier constructed at the Fukushima nuclear power plant to prevent contaminated water from leaking into the ocean has tilted, developing a crack about 500 meters (0.3 miles) in length along its base, local media report.

TOKYO (Sputnik) – The tilt, which reportedly occurred as a result of heavy groundwater pressure on the wall, is only about 20 centimeters (just short of 8 inches), but because of the crack there is a danger of ocean water getting contaminated. Continue reading

Trace levels of radioactive cesium-137 from Fukushima now being detected in Florida citrus fruits

(NaturalNews) Radioactive cesium from the 2011 Fukushima disaster is still being detected in citrus and other plants as far away as Florida, according to a report sent to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

In March 2011, multiple nuclear meltdowns took place at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan. The explosions ejected massive amounts of radioactive material into the environment, most notably radioactive cesium isotopes. In the weeks after the disaster, winds carried airborne radionuclides to every corner of the globe. Most of the radioactivity, however, settled into the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading

Is China Moving Closer to a Military Base on the Horn of Africa?

And the gates of the world shall be taken away:


Nuclear Experts: Million cancers could result from Fukushima — Already hundreds of times more thyroid cancers… “Just the tip of the iceberg… worst is yet to come” — “Enormous spikes in cancer… devastating health effects” (VIDEO)

Arnie Gundersen, chief engineer at Fairewinds, Nov 4, 2015: “It’s been almost 5 years from the Fukushima Daiichi meltdowns, and the news from Japan is still not good. Two reports recently released in Japan, one by Japanese medical professionals and the second from Tokyo Power Corporation – TEPCO – acknowledged that there will be numerous cancers in Japan, much greater than normal, due to the radioactive discharges from the triple meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi… Continue reading

QE’s Creeping Communism

Central banks and respective governments are running out of magical tricks to pull out of the hat.

As already done in America [government takeover of the banking industry (government bailout) and health industry (“Obamacare”)], the next step is the nationalization of industries in other developed nations like we’re seeing now in Japan.

This paves the way for communist rule by stealth, but most people don’t see this so long as the shopping malls are remain open and they can still drink their beer while watching the NFL.


Despite its much longer experience with monetary stimulus, Japan’s economy remains listless and has continuously flirted with recession. In spite of this failure, Japanese leaders, especially Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (and his ally at the Bank of Japan (BoJ), Haruhiko Kuroda), have recently doubled down on all prior bets. This has meant that the Japanese stimulus is now taking on some ominous dimensions that have yet to be seen here in the U.S. In particular, the Bank of Japan is considering using its Quantitative Easing budget to buy large quantities of shares of publicly traded Japanese corporations.So for those who remain in doubt, Japan is telling us where this giant monetary experiment leads to: Debt, stagnation and nationalization of industry. This is not a destination that any of us, with the possible exception of Bernie Sanders, should be happy about.

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Fukushima nuclear waste now being found off all U.S. states on West Coast — Detected near shorelines of California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska this summer — Highest radiation just miles from San Francisco (MAP)

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: In the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami off Japan, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant released cesium-134 and other radioactive elements into the ocean at unprecedented levels. Since then, the radioactive plume has traveled west across the Pacific… any cesium-134 detected in the ocean today must have come from Fukushima… We expect samples from the surface waters of the western Pacific that have not been contaminated by the Fukushima source to have 137Cs activity of between 1 and 2 Bq/m3 and for 134Cs to be “below detection.” Continue reading

Chinese supersonic ship killer makes U.S. Navy’s job harder

The USS Lassen guided-missile destroyer sails in the Pacific Ocean in November 2009. In a challenge to China’s territorial claims in the South China Sea, the U.S. Navy sent the Lassen within 12 nautical miles of artificial islands built by China in waters near the Spratly islands Tuesday. | REUTERS



Increased interactions between the Chinese and U.S. Navy in the contested South China Sea risk becoming more complicated by the increasingly sophisticated missiles being carried by submarines.

A new report to the U.S. Congress assessing a Chinese submarine-launched missile known as the YJ-18 highlights the danger, noting the missile accelerates to supersonic speed just before hitting its target, making it harder for a crew to defend their ship. Continue reading

Expect the Russians to Keep Buzzing American Navy Ships

Cold War-era tactics resurface at sea, but this time, Moscow’s ultimate intentions are unknown.

In the opening dogfight of “Top Gun,” a sailor stares at a radar screen, nervously calling out the distance of fictitious MiG-28 fighter jets challenging Tom Cruise in his F-14 Tomcat. His commander watches the foreign aircraft edge closer to his carrier, and finally barks, “250 miles — get ’em outta here.”

A similar scene likely unfolded Tuesday as two Russian Tupolev Tu-142s approached the USS Ronald Reagan in international waters near the Korean peninsula. The carrier launched four armed F/A-18 Super Hornets to intercept and escort the maritime patrol aircraft, variants of the venerable Bear bomber. Still, the Russian planes pressed on, eventually passing within one mile of the U.S. carrier. Continue reading

US Navy’s Challenge in South China Sea? Sheer Number of Chinese Ships

Not only do they have coast guard ships, they are now able to mobilize commercial ships, bringing the total to 172,000 vessels during a national emergency.


Hong Kong:  When a U.S. Navy guided-missile destroyer sailed near one of Beijing’s artificial islands in the disputed South China Sea this week, it was operating in a maritime domain bristling with Chinese ships.

While the U.S. Navy is expected to keep its technological edge in Asia for decades, China’s potential trump card is sheer weight of numbers, with dozens of naval and coastguard vessels routinely deployed in the South China Sea. Continue reading