Dollar to hit parity with euro in 2017

 

The dollar is likely to hit parity with the euro during 2017 driven by diverging paths for interest rates, according to Goldman Sachs’ chief economist.

The Federal Reserve is likely to hike interest rates three times in 2017, pushing it even further from the rate positioning stance of Europe during the course of the year, Jan Hatzius told CNBC at the Goldman Sachs Strategy Conference in London on Monday. Continue reading

The Next Domino Falls As Predicted… Here’s What Comes Next

 

I recently spent several weeks in Italy, taking the pulse of the country. The Italian referendum on December 4 turned out exactly how I predicted it would.

The “No” vote won in a landslide, with 59% of the vote versus 41% for “Yes,” with a 70% turnout.

The pro-EU Prime Minister promptly announced his resignation after the crushing defeat.

A surging populist party waits in the wings. They’re now likely a matter of months away from taking power and then holding a new referendum on whether Italy should dump the euro and go back to the lira.

If that happens, Italians will likely vote to leave. Continue reading

A Time Bomb

ROME/BERLIN (Own report) – Following Italian Prime Minster Matteo Renzi’s defeat in Sunday’s referendum, Berlin is urging Rome to quickly form a “capable government” and resume its adjustment to the German model of austerity. “The economic problems have to be tackled at the roots,” said Jens Weidmann, head of Germany’s central bank, yesterday. German financial experts are floating the idea of a cabinet of technocrats, modeled on the Mario Monti government. Monti ruled for a year and a half beginning in November 2011, without having been democratically elected and initiated an austerity program considered extremely harsh. Time is pressing: the bank crisis, caused, to a large extent, by bankruptcies due to German austerity dictates, which has been festering in Italy for a long time, is threatening to escalate. The Monte dei Paschi di Siena tradition bank’s recapitalization planned this week is acutely endangered. It cannot be ruled out that its bank crisis could soon spread to other Italian credit institutions and to German banks. Continue reading

EURO PLUNGE: Single currency could ‘COLLAPSE’ against dollar amid record losing streak

Investors have frantically dumped the single currency over 10 consecutive trading sessions – the worst performance since the euro was introduced in 1999.

Head of the European Central Bank (ECB) Mario Draghi failed to ease fears after warning that the eurozone recovery depends on action by monetary policymakers. Continue reading

European Central Bank gold reserves held across 5 locations. ECB will not disclose Gold Bar List.

Table 1: Central bank FX and Gold transfers to the ECB, January 1999

 

The European Central Bank (ECB), creator of the Euro, currently claims to hold 504.8 tonnes of gold reserves. These gold holdings are reflected on the ECB balance sheet and arose from transfers made to the ECB by Euro member national central banks, mainly in January 1999 at the birth of the Euro. As of the end of December 2015, these ECB gold reserves were valued on the ECB balance sheet at market prices and amounted to €15.79 billion. 

The ECB very recently confirmed to BullionStar that its gold reserves are stored across 5 international locations. However, the ECB also confirmed that it does not physically audit its gold, nor will it divulge a bar list / weight list of these gold bar holdings.

Questions and Answers

BullionStar recently put a number of questions to the European Central Bank about the ECB’s gold holdings. The ECB Communications Directorate replied to these questions with answers that appear to include a number of facts about the ECB gold reserves which have not previously been published. The questions put to the ECB and its responses are listed below (underlining added): Continue reading

War On Cash Intensifies: Citibank To Stop Accepting Cash At Some Branches

Less than a week after India’s surprise move to scrap its highest denomination cash notes, another front in the War on Cash has intensified down under in Australia.

Yesterday, banking giant UBS proposed that eliminating Australia’s $100 and $50 bills would be “good for the economy and good for the banks.”

(How convenient that a bank would propose something that’s good for banks!)

This isn’t the first time that the financial establishment has pushed for a cashless society in Australia (or anywhere else). Continue reading

Euro “Will Collapse” As Is “House of Cards” Warns Architect of Euro

The Euro “will collapse” as it is a”house of cards” warned Otmar Issing, the founder and creator of the euro in an extraordinary interview on Monday.

In the explosive interview with the journal Central Banking, Professor Issing, said “one day, the house of cards will collapse”  as the European Central Bank (ECB) is becoming dangerously over-extended and the whole euro project is unworkable in its current form.

The founding architect of the monetary union has warned that Brussels’ dream of a European superstate will finally be buried amongst the rubble of the crumbling single currency he designed. Continue reading

Italy tried to QUIT EURO five years ago and now faces WORSE situation, economist claims

FORMER Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi was holding secret talks to get his country out of the Eurozone FIVE YEARS AGO, according to a leading German economist.

Hans-Werner Sinn, former president of the German Ifo Institute for Economic Research, has painted a grim picture of the Italian economy and warned it faces a struggle to survive such a ‘catastrophic situation’.

He said Mr Berlusconi realised the Italian economy could not survive within the single currency back in the autumn of 2011 and saw no alternative to pulling out as quickly as possible.  Continue reading

China Seeking to Succeed Where Japan Failed in Yuan Global Push

As China’s yuan takes the first steps toward becoming a global reserve currency, Japan offers a lesson on how hard it is to rival the dollar’s supremacy.

The Japanese yen’s share of global reserves reached a record 8.5 percent in 1991 as the nation’s post-War industrial boom made its economy the world’s second-largest. But its economic decline soon resulted in its clout shrinking as the euro gained ground and the greenback re-asserted its dominance. While the yen is still ranked third for trading and fourth for payments, it now accounts for just 4 percent of world reserves, compared with the dollar’s 64 percent and the yuan’s 1 percent. Continue reading

China’s Ambitious Plan to Make the Yuan the World’s Go-To Currency

China’s long-held desire to provide an alternative to the U.S. dollar will get a boost on October 1, when the yuan enters the International Monetary Fund’s basket of reserve currencies, placing it alongside the pound, euro, yen and dollar. The yuan’s ascent is a validation of the importance of the world’s second-biggest economy and the work policy makers have done to allow freer access to the nation’s markets.

Continue reading

European Leaders Discuss Plan for European Army

The United States of Europe is underway and its complimenting European Army is under construction. You’re looking at quite possibly the world’s next superpower — all courtesy of Germany’s Fourth Reich. All this of course is made easier when you run two-thirds of the Troika and have pushed Great Britain out of the EU bloc. None of this would happen if America would stop suiciding itself into the dustbin of history and remain a reliable partner by standing its ground on the world stage.

Either way, yes, they’re back. If you’re looking for Nazis, you’re 70 years too late. The game plan has entered a new phase.

(Note: The article will remain in full for documentation purposes.)

 

Soldiers from the Eurocorps on parade in Strasbourg, France, on January 31, 2013. Eurocorps is an intergovernmental military unit of approximately 1,000 soldiers from Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg and Spain, stationed in Strasbourg. (Image: Claude Truong-Ngoc/Wikimedia Commons)

 

“We are going to move towards an EU army much faster than people believe.”

  • Critics say that the creation of a European army, a long-held goal of European federalists, would entail an unprecedented transfer of sovereignty from European nation states to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels, the de facto capital of the EU.
  • Others say that efforts to move forward on European defense integration show that European leaders have learned little from Brexit, and are determined to continue their quest to build a European superstate regardless of opposition from large segments of the European public.
  • “Those of us who have always warned about Europe’s defense ambitions have always been told not to worry… We’re always told not to worry about the next integration and then it happens. We’ve been too often conned before and we must not be conned again.” — Liam Fox, former British defense secretary.
  • “[C]reation of EU defense structures, separate from NATO, will only lead to division between transatlantic partners at a time when solidarity is needed in the face of many difficult and dangerous threats to the democracies.” — Geoffrey Van Orden, UK Conservative Party defense spokesman.

European leaders are discussing “far-reaching proposals” to build a pan-European military, according to a French defense ministry document leaked to the German newspaper, the Süddeutsche Zeitung.

The efforts are part of plans to relaunch the European Union at celebrations in Rome next March marking the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, which established the European Community. Continue reading

The Coming Dollar Rally – Chaos in Europe

 

Margaret Thatcher was spot on when she warned that Britain would not join the Euro for the covert maneuvers behind the scenes was to create the federalization of Europe – their real dream to be the United States of Europe. Thatcher was betrayed by her own cabinet because some members also were dreaming to federalize Europe. Continue reading

Leading from the Center

BERLIN (Own report) – The Berlin office of an EU-wide think tank, is warning of how the “frustration over German dominance” is growing among EU member countries. Over the past ten years, the Federal Republic of Germany has become the EU’s undisputed strongest power, according to a recent analysis of the European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR). The “EU partners” must now “decide how to handle Germany’s power.” Some have expressed resentment; others have “centered their EU strategies around Germany,” and look for “ways to influence Berlin’s policy machinery.” None of this leaves any doubt that “Germany’s political class” continues to see the EU as “the best available framework for the articulation of its national interest.” Whereas the ECFR’s analysis concentrates its attention primarily on the political establishment of the other EU countries, the supplementary question to be raised in how to deal with German dominance is becoming increasingly urgent. Berlin is impelling the militarization of foreign policy as well as domestic surveillance and repression, measures, serving the preparation for war – a concern of everyone.

Continue reading

Banks are preparing for an ‘economic nuclear winter’

Video available for viewing at the source.

 

The first half of 2016 has been a roller-coaster for financial markets. A combination of uncertainties surrounding the U.K.’s vote to leave the European Union and weaker-than-expected corporate earnings results across the region means a tough second half looms.

European banks, in particular, have had a very tough six months as the shock and volatility around Brexit sent banking stocks south. Major European banks like Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse saw their shares in free-fall after the referendum’s results were announced. In the U.K., RBS was the worst-hit, with its shares plunging by more than 30 percent since June 24.

The current uncertainty over when the U.K. will start the process of quitting the EU has banks on tenterhooks. But a source told CNBC that banks are “preparing for an economic nuclear winter situation.”

Continue reading

Poland first in Europe to issue RMB debt in China

Poland has become the first European country to issue government debt into China’s mainland bond market, with a bond of 3 billion yuan ($452 million), marking a significant milestone for renminbi’s growing use internationally, which builds towards its reserve currency status. Continue reading