Europe, China, Japan and the New World Order

KENT NISHIMURA/GETTY IMAGES, SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES, MATT CARDY/GETTY IMAGES

 

A stunning fulfillment of a specific Bible prophecy

We are witnessing a shift in the world order that happens only once in a generation. The global system of alliances is being shaken. Such turmoil usually indicates a massive shift in global power. These shifts often trigger major wars.

For most of the 19th century, Britain’s top enemy was Russia. Britain’s whole system of alliances was built to isolate and oppose Russian power. But at the turn of the century, other powers were rising, most notably Germany. This development triggered a complete shake-up. Russia veered from enemy to ally in 1907. World War i followed on the heels of this upheaval.

That shift in alliances did not cause World War i. But it was a symptom of some of the other long-term causes. Continue reading

Russia’s on the Way Back

Yellen and Nabiullina

 

Russia is poised to break out of its oil-related slump and become one of the best performing emerging markets economies in the years ahead. This sleeping giant is breaking its dependence on oil prices and embraces diversified growth.

When you hear the name “Russia” you probably run for cover. Russia has been the subject of nearly continuous media coverage bordering on frenzy since the election of Donald Trump last November. Continue reading

Theresa May threatens US with trade war over Bombardier row

Theresa May threatens US with trade war over Bombardier row CREDIT: AP

 

Theresa May has threatened a trade war with the US after it slapped punitive tariffs on British-built aircraft, casting doubt on a key plank of her Brexit strategy.

The US Department of Commerce decided Bombardier aircraft, built in Northern Ireland, should be subject to 219 per cent import duty after the American aviation giant Boeing complained that Bombardier had been given unfair state aid.

The Government responded by warning that Boeing’s behaviour “could jeopardise” future Ministry of Defence contracts for its aircraft such as Apache helicopters. Continue reading

EU will make sure Brexit deal is NEGATIVE for Britain – ex-German envoy’s shock admission

DavidDavis_Germandiplomat

Thomas Matussek said Britain would not gain from leaving the European Union [GETTY•DW NEWS]

A GERMAN diplomat lambasted ‘hard’ Brexiteers who think Britain can gain from leaving the European Union, saying Brussels will make sure the move is negative.

Thomas Matussek, former German Ambassador to the UK, said the Brexit divorce bill would be “considerable” and transitional period “long”.

Speaking on the Today programme, on BBC Radio 4, Mr Matussek said any positives for the UK on leaving the bloc would “encourage other” member states rot follow Britain out. Continue reading

‘EU Army is Dangerous and Must be Stopped’, MP Warns

 

Britain will be the first of many nations to leave the EU, Daniel Kawczynski MP tells Westmonster.

The EU Army is dangerous, will be ‘a disaster’ and must be stopped from coming to fruition, Tory MP Daniel Kawczynski told Westmonster.

In a no holds barred interview, Kawczynski said he is absolutely certain Britain will be the first of many countries to leave the EU and added that he knows Eastern European nations are getting sick and tired of Brussels meddling in their domestic affairs. Continue reading

143 Million Affected in Hack of U.S. Credit Agency

A major American credit reporting agency entrusted to safeguard personal financial information said Thursday hackers looted its system in a colossal breach that could affect nearly half the US population as well as people in Britain and Canada.

Equifax said that a hack it learned about on July 29 had the potential to affect 143 million US customers, and involved some data for British and Canadian residents.

The Atlanta-based company disclosed the breach in a release that did not explain why it waited more than a month to warn those affected about a risk of identity theft. Continue reading

Wary of robots taking jobs, Hawaii toys with guaranteed pay

Here what your very near future looks like. It’s actually already here in a sense with 3D printing, autonomous vehicles on the road, etc… The only thing keeping it from being on a full scale is a catalyst. Robotics and virtual reality are the fourth industrial revolution. Inventions such as HyperLoop will destroy businesses from airlines and taxi services (even Uber) to the postal service and automobile manufacturers.

Logistics will be changed forever — and that’s just one sector. Whatever is redundant will be taken over. This includes not only blue collar jobs such as restaurant services, but white collar jobs such as accounting and financial analysis. A good example would also be in the banking industry where tellers are already replaced with ATMs, and likely soon to be completely replaced and out of work.

A modern day feudal system will be built in response, where the politicians lord over the formerly employed, peasants of today’s times.

 

HONOLULU — Driverless trucks. Factory robots. Delivery drones. Virtual personal assistants.

As technological innovations increasingly edge into the workplace, many people fear that robots and machines are destined to take jobs that human beings have held for decades–a trend that is already happening in stores and factories around the country. For many affected workers, retraining might be out of reach —unavailable, unaffordable or inadequate.

What then?

Enter the idea of a universal basic income, the notion that everyone should be able to receive a stream of income to live on, regardless of their employment or economic status.

Continue reading

What Would A U.S. Civil War Look Like?

Trump election

 

Yes, there is a civil war looming in the United States.

But it will look little like the orderly pattern of descent which spiraled into the conflict of 1861-65. It will appear more like the Yugoslavia break-up, or the Russian and Chinese civil wars of the 20th Century.

It will appear as an evolving chaos.

And the next US civil war, though it yet may be arrested to a degree by the formal hand of centralized gov-ernment, will destabilize many other nation-states, including the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Continue reading

U.S. Is A Net Exporter Of Natural Gas For First Time In 59 Years

Source: EIA

 

Exports outweigh imports in February, April, May: EIA

The U.S. has been a net exporter of natural gas for three of the first five months of 2017, according to a note released by the EIA. This is historically significant, as February, April and May are so far, the only months in which the U.S has been a net exporter of natural gas since 1958. Continue reading

Pieces of Fukushima reactor cores still floating around, new study reveals — Hot particles with over 1 Quadrillion becquerels per kilogram detected — Radioactive materials contain Uranium, Polonium, Americium (VIDEO)

Science of the Total Environment, by Marco Kaltofen (Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Department of Physics, Worcester Polytechnic Institute) and Arnie Gundersen (Fairewinds Energy Education), Dec 2017 (emphasis added): Radioactively-hot particles detected in dusts and soils from Northern Japan… Radioactive particles from Fukushima are tracked via dusts, soils, and sediments; Radioactive dust impacts are tracked in both Japan and the United States/Canada; Atypically-radioactive particles from reactor cores are identified in house dusts… After the March 11, 2011, nuclear reactor meltdowns at Fukushima Dai-ichi, 180 samples of Japanese particulate matter (dusts and surface soils) and 235 similar U.S. and Canadian samples were collected and analyzed… Continue reading

IMF Sees U.S. Fading as Global Growth Engine

Please see the source for the video.

 

  • Fund lowers forecast for U.K. growth after soft first quarter
  • Growth seen picking up in China, Japan, euro zone, Canada

The world is leaning less on its biggest economy to sustain the global recovery, according to the International Monetary Fund.

The fund left its forecast for global growth unchanged in the latest quarterly update to its World Economic Outlook, released Monday in Kuala Lumpur. The world economy will expand 3.5 percent this year, up from 3.2 percent in 2016, and by 3.6 percent next year, the IMF said. The forecasts for this year and next are unchanged from the fund’s projections in April. Continue reading

Japan’s Shifting Power Alliances

 

I’ve just wrapped up a long trip to Japan. And I’ve taken away one lesson from all of my conversations, speeches and research: The rise of nationalism in the U.S. will cause massive shifts in global trade alliances.

One of the main beneficiaries will be Japan. Now, Japan might not be on your radar, day-to-day, but it’s about to play a very important role in the world of Donald Trump.

Here’s what I mean… Continue reading

IMF Rings The Alarm On Canada’s Economy

 

Shortly after yesterday’s rate hike by the Bank of Canada, its first since 2010, we warned that as rates in Canada begin to rise, the local economy which has seen a striking decline in hourly earnings in the past year, which remains greatly reliant on a vibrant construction sector, and where households are the most levered on record, if there is anything that can burst the local housing bubble, it is tighter monetary conditions. And a bubble it is, as the chart below clearly demonstrates… one just waiting for the pin, which as we suggested yesterday in “”Canada Is In Serious Trouble” Again, And This Time It’s For Real“, may have finally been provided thanks to the Bank of Canada itself. Continue reading

U.S. To Be A Top-Ten Oil Exporter In Three Years

US

 

PIRA Energy has predicted that U.S. crude oil exports will top 2 million barrels by 2020, reaching 2.25 million bpd. That’s more than what most OPEC members export, the FT notes, citing the research company’s figures. As of 2016, the U.S. average daily export rate was just 520,000 bpd, although in May, the average daily was 1.02 million barrels, after the 1-million-bpd mark was passed early in the year. Continue reading

Cash Is Falling Out of Fashion – Will It Disappear Forever?

 

On June 27, the ATM turns 50. Former US Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker once described it as the “only useful innovation in banking.” But today, the cash that ATMs dispense may be on the endangered list.

Cash is being displaced in so many ways that it’s hard to keep track. There are credit cards and electronic payments; apps such as Venmo, PayPal and Square Cash; mobile payments services; cryptocurrencies that operate outside the purview of central banks; and localized offerings such as Kenya’s mPesa, India’s Paytm and Bangladesh’s bKash. These innovations are encouraging cashlessness across communities worldwide.

It’s reasonable to expect cash to follow the path of other goods that have been replaced by digital alternatives, such as photos, music, and movies. Will cash – and the ATMs that dispense it – experience a “Blockbuster” moment and disappear from our neighborhoods? Continue reading