The War on Cash Is a War on Your Freedom to Opt Out

Cash is a proxy for the freedom to maintain some privacy in an era of Big Brother repression, surveillance and the suppression of dissent.

Our first question should be: just how big a share of our financial universe is cash? The answer is: vanishingly small. Look at this chart of total credit in the U.S. economy–$63 trillion–and total cash: $1.45 trillion. Cash is the thin red line at the bottom of the chart–it barely registers.

If cash is such a small share of money and assets, why are governments so keen to ban cash?

The official answer is to limit money-laundering by drug traffickers and criminals. But laundering money through official banking channels is not that difficult, so cash is not necessary for laundering.

Another official reason is tax evasion. But tax evasion is now so easy, once again cash is not required: The World’s Favorite New Tax Haven Is the United States: Moving money out of the usual offshore secrecy havens and into the U.S. is a brisk new business.

THE BIGGEST TAX HAVEN OF THEM ALL? THE U.S., FATCA AND THE CRS “By resisting new global disclosure standards, the U.S. is creating a hot new market, becoming the go-to place to stash foreign wealth. Everyone from London lawyers to Swiss trust companies is getting in on the act, helping the world’s rich move accounts from places like the Bahamas and the British Virgin Islands to Nevada, Wyoming, and South Dakota.”

The irony of the situation has not been lost on at least one foreign observer – a Swiss lawyer quoted in the Bloomberg report:

“How ironic-no, how perverse-that the USA, which has been so sanctimonious in its condemnation of Swiss banks, has become the banking secrecy jurisdiction du jour. That ‘giant sucking sound’ you hear? It is the sound of money rushing to the USA.”

So if large-scale money-laundering and tax evasion no longer require cash, why are governments so anxious to ban cash? The simple answer is to eliminate small-time tax evasion by making every transaction visible to authorities.

This raises the obvious question: how much extra tax revenue would be raised by eliminating cash purchases at swap meets, garage sales, farmer’s markets, etc.? Let’s face it–the revenues gained would be modest, as many of the people using cash don’t earn enough to pay much income tax anyway.

As for drug-related transactions–does anyone seriously think a buyer of street heroin is going to log the sale electronically via a debit card? Or that the dealer would digitally transact the purchase as “heroin, sold by ABC Dealers, Inc.”?

Full article: The War on Cash Is a War on Your Freedom to Opt Out (Family Security Matters)

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