Sweden Facing Another Migrant Invasion?

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Left: According to Sweden’s current law, the government can only operate border controls six months at a time, and there is a two week waiting period before the controls can be reinstated. Right: Fifteen-year-old Arminas Pileckas was stabbed to death at school, but the young Syrian who murdered him will not be charged or penalized. The age of criminal responsibility in Sweden is 15, and the murderer claims he is 14. The murderer’s father blamed the school, saying they “did nothing to help him or to restore his honor [because the victim interfered with his sexual advances]. Instead, my son had to see [Arminas] at school every day. It upset him very much.”

 

  • Swedish law only allows the government to operate border controls six months at a time, and there is a two-week waiting period before the controls can be reinstated. The two-week lapse is scheduled for July 4-17; many fear that tens of thousands of migrants will seize the opportunity to enter Sweden during this time.
  • A new report on migrants in Sweden, based on interviews with 1,100 students in Stockholm (90% of respondents were Muslims) found that immigrant youths live in a different world from their Swedish peers. 83% of the girls are not allowed to have male friends, 62% of the boys are not allowed to have female friends.
  • After several sexual attacks on women in Östersund, the local police issued a warning that women are not safe outdoors after dark. Since February 20, eight women have been sexually assaulted or raped in the town.
  • A bus driver was suspended from work after sharing posts on Facebook that were critical of immigration. A wave of public criticism of the bus company then led them to reverse the decision. The company admitted that the driver had never treated anyone badly.
  • The Swedish Security Service has identified at least 60 asylum seekers as terrorists and a threat to the country. However, the Immigration Service refuses to deport them.

In early March, the Swedish government announced that the country’s tighter border controls at the Öresund Bridge might remain in place for the foreseeable future, and that they may even become permanent. The problem, however, is that this summer, a two-week lapse will occur. According to the current law, the government can only operate border controls six months at a time, and there is a two week waiting period before the controls can be reinstated. The gap will occur July 4-17, right in the middle of the European vacation period. Many people fear that tens of thousands of migrants will seize the opportunity to enter Sweden during this time. When the migration wave peaked in the fall of 2015, Sweden received 9,000 migrants per week. So far this year, the number has been steady at 600-700 per week.

Prime Minister Stefan Löfven recently stated: “The number of people coming to Sweden has decreased dramatically. More are applying for asylum in the EU. That was the whole point.”

According to the government, the “public order and inner safety of Sweden” would still be at risk if the border and ID checks were to cease.

The Minister for Justice and Migration, Morgan Johansson, pointed out that sustaining the border controls sends an important signal to the half a million migrants now staying in Germany who have not sought asylum there. Neither minister mentioned anything, however, about how Sweden should avoid being flooded by these people during the two-week lapse in border controls.

March 2: An opinion poll by the Inizio polling institute, commissioned by the newspaper Aftonbladet, showed that 46% of Swedish women feel unsafe when they go out alone at night. Women who venture out despite their fears say they stay in constant contact with a friend or relative on their mobile phones while out at night.

March 4: At an asylum seekers residence in the small rural village of Storå, a 19-year-old man received a fatal knife wound to his throat. The police apprehended three suspects, all residents of the asylum seekers home, one of whom has since been remanded into custody. The murder caused great concern among the residents of the village. “I worry about everything. I don’t go out at night,” one woman told the public radio broadcaster, Sveriges Radio.

March 7: It was reported that the young Syrian who murdered 15-year-old Arminas Pileckas at the Göingeskolan school in Broby will not be charged with murder, or penalized in any way — even though the investigation shows that he committed the murder. The age of criminal responsibility in Sweden is 15, and the murderer claims he is 14. Arminas Pileckas, whose family immigrated to Sweden from Lithuania, was apparently very well-liked. His murder stirred up emotion, not least because it turned out that he had protected a girl in his class from the Syrian’s unwanted sexual advances. Aftonbladet interviewed the murderer’s father, who blamed the school for his son’s stabbing Arminas in the back:

“The school did nothing to help him or to restore his honor [because the victim interfered with his sexual advances]. Instead, my son had to see [Arminas] at school every day. It upset him very much.”

March 9: Panicked shoppers at the Hallunda mall ran for cover when a masked burglar pointed an automatic weapon at them. A group of robbers drove a car into a jewelry store and were busy plundering it, when an elderly man tried to intervene: “I walked up to one of them, but he knocked me over and threatened me with a weapon,” the man told the news site, Nyheter Idag. Several shots were fired, but no one was injured. So far, there have been no arrests.

March 10: An Iraqi man with Swedish citizenship was sentenced to one year in prison for abusing his wife and child. The man tried to force his wife and daughter to wear a veil; when they refused, he beat them and threatened them with a knife.

March 10: Two asylum-seeker families were so dissatisfied with the housing they were offered, located on the upscale Nygatan street in central Norrköping, that they refused to get off the bus. Because of this, traffic on the street was blocked. The police told the local daily, Norrköpings Tidningar:

“We remain at the scene, because things are a little jumbled there right now. The families are displeased with the standard of the apartment, so they refused to get off the bus at first. We are talking to the families right now, and referring them to the Social Services office on Drottninggatan or the Immigration Service.”

March 10: The street artist Dan Park, who has been convicted of “hate speech” on several occasions, was arrested again. According to the prosecution, the alleged offenses this time were committed on social media in May, June and September 2015, when he “made condescending remarks against persons concerning their ethnicity.”

The Swedish justice system, which frequently lets rapists get away with a “slap on the wrist,” has let loose in its campaign against the artist and his provocative images of Roma, black people and Muslims. In October 2014, he was sentenced to five months in prison — for exhibiting his work at an art gallery.

In Denmark, Dan Park has received quite different treatment by the media and the establishment. The public television broadcaster Danmarks Radio recently aired an hour-long documentary on the artist, who himself feels that Sweden is applying the Nazi concept Entartete Kunst, (“Degenerate Art”), where the state imprisons artists who produce “objectionable” art.

March 29: A particularly brutal rape against a woman in Ludvika in August resulted in five Eritrean men being sentenced to eight months in prison, and one man, five years in prison. The woman was lured into an apartment in which there were eight men; one of them raped her while the others held her down. She escaped by jumping out a second story window. In December, a District Court acquitted two of the men, while five received ten months in prison for aggravated rape, and one, five years in prison. The prosecutor considered the men refugees, and therefore did not even press for deportation. The Court of Appeals concurred with the five-year sentence against the 21-year-old, but lowered the others’ sentences to eight months — for “neglecting to report a crime.”

March 30: Three African men were sentenced to four years in prison and deportation after gang-raping a Swedish woman in Ludvika in October 2015. The men followed the woman around town, and caught up with her in an alley where they formed a ring round her. They pulled down her underwear and held her down so they could rape her vaginally and anally. The rape lasted at least 15 minutes, and the woman cried for help the whole time. Finally, a Swedish man appeared at the scene, which caused the rapists scatter and run.

The police found the rapists by DNA-testing a number of suspects. Two of the men are from Eritrea, and have had permanent residency status in Sweden since 2015. The third man is an asylum seeker from Sudan. The court ruling states that “in light of the situation in Eritrea,” deportations to that country cannot be enforced — meaning that the rapists will remain in Sweden for the foreseeable future.

March 30: Another gang-rape took place aboard a ferry to Finland. In all, six young men are suspects in the case. Five of them have an immigrant background; the sixth has a Swedish mother and a Somali father.

The rape occurred when a large group of young people sailed on the M/S Galaxy to celebrate their high school graduation. Two of the accused rapists, now in custody, turned out to also be suspects in an earlier murder investigation. But because the prosecutor chose not to remand them into custody in connection with that investigation, they were free to go on the ferry trip, and apparently commit another serious crime.

Full article: Sweden Facing Another Migrant Invasion? (Gatestone Institute)

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