Russia ‘tried to cut off’ World Wide Web

In actuality, it sounds more like a dry run for when the lights go out worldwide after a large scale attack on America’s infrastructure. People will naturally see this as a communist “clamp down on freedoms” as the article describes, however, this could be a test of insulation as opposed to isolation. It would be simple case of making an attack, cutting off the internet and shielding yourself.

 

Russia has run large scale experiments to test the feasibility of cutting the country off the World Wide Web, a senior industry executive has claimed.

The tests, which come amid mounting concern about a Kremlin campaign to clamp down on internet freedoms, have been described by experts as preparations for an information blackout in the event of a domestic political crisis.

Andrei Semerikov, general director of a Russian service provider called Er Telecom, said Russia’s ministry of communications and Roskomnadzor, the national internet regulator, ordered communications hubs run by the main Russian internet providers to block traffic to foreign communications channels by using a traffic control system called DPI.

The objective was to see whether the Runet – the informal name for the Russian internet – could continue to function in isolation from the global internet.

The experiment, which took place in spring this year, failed because thousands of smaller service providers, which Roskomnadzor has little control over, continued to pass information out of the country, Mr Semerikov said.

Smaller providers account for over 50 per cent of the market in some Russian regions, generally lack the DPI technology used by the larger companies to implement the blocking orders, and often use satellite connections that cannot be easily blocked.

Russian officials denied any such experiment had taken place. A Roskomnadzor spokesman said “there was not such experiment”. The agency had not responded to a written request for further details by close of business Thursday.

Full article: Russia ‘tried to cut off’ World Wide Web (The Telegraph)

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