Space Transport Law Keeps US Dependent on Russian Space Engines

Not only is the United States dependent on Russian space engines, it’s (NASA) also dependent on Russia to even reach space and has to pay $68 million per astronaut lifted up (See also HERE). Further adding insult to injury, Russia has even banned American astronauts from the International Space Station from the year 2020 on. Regardless of whatever Russia does, the United States continues to suicide itself and has even as recently as March of this year, decided to scrap its own rockets in favor of its Russian counterpart’s rockets.

Why a nation with so many checks and balances to prevent national suicide would do this is just beyond words. The only logical explanation is a fifth column destroying the nation from within. You don’t make hundreds of mistakes in a row and get to be called an idiot. However, the current American leadership loves it when ignorant citizens call them stupid or ignorant, as proving everything as being intentional makes them criminal.

 

https://i0.wp.com/www.spxdaily.com/images-lg/two-grey-rd-180-engine-lg.jpg

Snead, an aerospace engineer, said there would be significant risk for ULA to abandon the Russian RD-180 engine.

 

Thomas Zimmer – The US government’s space transportation policy continues to keep the country using primarily Russian space engines, experts told Sputnik on Friday.

“US national space transportation policy has been haunted by the ‘we hope for the best’ political decisions made since the 1980s that have continued the use of expendable launch vehicles,” Spacefaring Institute President Mike Snead said.

On Tuesday, US Defense Undersecretary Frank Kendall said the Pentagon will decide soon whether to give a waiver to United Launch Alliance (ULA), a joint venture of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, which permit it to continue using Russian rocket engines.

“With a large and established industry and a captive US government market, this industry and its government supporters have walked the United States down the path of… a continued reliance of Russia for engines for the primary national launch capability,” Snead explained.

Snead, an aerospace engineer, said there would be significant risk for ULA to abandon the Russian RD-180 engine.

Engine alternatives to the RD-180 are being considered. These would require some measure of vehicle redesign with the degree of redesign depending on issues such as total thrust, lsp [lunar soil propellant], and fuel mixture ratio,” Snead pointed out.”

He added, the adaptations would take several years and would bring additional program risk.

Full article: Space Transport Law Keeps US Dependent on Russian Space Engines (SpaceDaily)

Comments are closed.