Rise of the brain-controlled robot ARMIES: Chinese military trains students to control machines with their minds

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Students at the People’s Liberation Army Information Engineering University in Zhengzhou are being taught to control robots using only their thoughts. In the image above an instructor looks at a computer with a student, who is wearing a cap with electrodes embedded in it to detect the electrical activity of their brain

 

  • Researchers have developed technology that allows students to control robots through a cap that detects the faint electrical activity of their brains
  • Students can control the robots’ movement and get them to pick up objects
  • Officials say the technology could provide new types of home appliances
  • It is being developed at a Chinese military academy in Zhengzhou

Forget joysticks and exoskeletons, the future of warfare could see robot armies controlled using just a commander’s mind.

China has been training students at a military academy to use headsets that detect and interpret the brain activity of the wearer, allowing them to control the machines.

At a demonstration at the People’s Liberation Army Information Engineering University in Zhengzhou, students used the device to send robots trundling in different directions.

They were also able to turn the robot’s heads and get them to pick up objects.

The technology uses a brain computer interface known as a electroencephalograph, which uses electrodes embedded in a cap to detect tiny changes in the electrical activity of the brain.

While instructors at the laboratory insist the technology could be used to control all manner of equipment and home appliances, it has raised fears it could also be used for warfare.

Rather than having to put its soldiers into the battlefield, China could exploit the technology to send mind-controlled robots into action.

Full article: Rise of the brain-controlled robot ARMIES: Chinese military trains students to control machines with their minds (Daily Mail)

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