Bird Flu Is Slamming Factory Farms But Sparing Backyard Flocks. Why?

Why? Because we’re likely seeing bio-terrorism.

Terrorists who could be poisoning the food supply don’t care about the smaller targets since they will have little or no impact if 50 chickens wind up dead. They are bent on maximum damage to human health and economic destruction. Prices are skyrocketing and the food supply is facing shortage and scarcity issues.

Don’t be surpised this Thanksgiving if you find difficulty in putting a Turkey on the table.

 

The Midwest’s ongoing avian flu crisis is wreaking havoc on the region’s large-scale egg and turkey farms. Last week alone, the US Department of Agriculture confirmed that the virus had turned up in more than 20 additional facilities in the region, condemning 4 million birds to euthanasia. Altogether, the H5N2 virus—”highly pathogenic” to birds, so far non-threatening to humans—has affected 168 sites and a jaw-dropping 36 million birds, the great bulk of them in Iowa and surrounding states. It’s the largest avian flu outbreak in US history—and it has already wiped out 40 percent of the egg-laying flock h Iowa, the number-one egg-producing state in the US, according to The New York Times.

But it’s largely leaving backyard flocks unscathed. Why?

According to Hon S. Ip, a virologist at the US Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center, it’s a genuine mystery. Backyard flocks typically roam outdoors, in ready contact with wild birds, which are thought to be the origin of the virus. Their commercial counterparts live in tight confinement under strict “biosecurity” protocols: birds are shielded from contact with the outdoors; workers change into special boots and coveralls—or even shower—before entering facilities, etc.

Ip said that wild birds could be spreading the virus in one of two ways: directly, by bringing chickens and turkeys into contact with infected feces; or indirectly, through wind-borne particles that, say, blow through vents in a confined facility. “If that’s how it’s spreading, you’d expect backyard flocks to be widely affected too, but they don’t seem to be,” he told me. Moreover, it has continued to spread in Iowa, even after the egg industry had ample time to ramp up biosecurity. All of this suggests something else, besides wild birds, might be the cause, Ip added.

But what? He has no idea, he said. And nor, apparently, does anyone else. In a recent news item [paywalled], the journal Science declared the outbreak “enigmatic.” “All the old dogma about high-path influenza transmission has just gone out the window,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy here at the University of Minnesota, told the journal. “We’re in totally uncharted territory.”

Full article: Bird Flu Is Slamming Factory Farms But Sparing Backyard Flocks. Why? (Mother Jones)

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