It’s not just smart TVs. Your home is full of gadgets that spy on you: How internet giants are collecting your personal data through their high-tech devices

And what will be done about this? Nothing. At best, and sadly, the most amount of action anyone will take is sitting around the dinner table and complaining about it with family and friends. Then the next day begins and it’s already forgotten, then on to with the next issue of the day. The American Shopping Mall Regime has better things to do, such as following the Kardashians while the country falls apart all around them.

 

This evening, while you settle down to watch Death In Paradise or Birds Of A Feather, the disturbing reality is that your television set may also be watching and listening to you.

If you own a ‘smart TV’ from South Korean tech giant Samsung, every word you say can be captured by the device and beamed over the internet to Samsung and to any other companies with whom it chooses to share your data.

This ability for the TV to earwig your conversations on the sofa is part of the set’s voice command feature, which enables viewers to tell the TV to change channels rather than use a remote.

Such a feature is typical of many smart TVs, which are to the humble old cathode ray TV set what a jet aircraft is to a propeller plane.

Crucially, smart television sets connect to the internet, from where they can download programmes and films from services such as Netflix or BBC iPlayer. And increasingly, experts are realising that if the internet can be used to bring information into your TV, it can also be used to take it out.

Smart TVs also have a whole range of advanced features, of which voice recognition is one.

And it’s not just television sets. It emerged yesterday that millions of Britons are being spied on by Microsoft’s voice-activated Xbox games consoles, which can listen in to everything around them.

In its privacy policy, Microsoft states that it is ‘only interested in your voice commands to Xbox, which we capture along with any ambient background noise. If you give Microsoft permission, we record commands whether you are online or offline’.

The company says it stores this data and, under its privacy policy, states that it can share it with ‘affiliates and vendors’.

However, despite Microsoft’s assurances that the data is safe, one has only to look at how Xbox’s Live Platform servers were brought down by hackers on Christmas Day to realise that our data is far from secure.

Full article: It’s not just smart TVs. Your home is full of gadgets that spy on you: How internet giants are collecting your personal data through their high-tech devices (Daily Mail)

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