US a dangerous ally: former Australia PM

While he may be somewhat right, he still leaves Australia with only two options, neither of which are arguably in the best interests of Australians. They’re stuck between a rock and a hard place as the United States suicidally declines.

Option one: Turn is back on America and go it alone in the world without America and run the risk of an inferior military being annihilated by China. Option two: Turn its back on America and side with China because you’re afraid of option one. Both options will in any case leave Australians with the task of learning Chinese.

 

In his new book titled “Dangerous Allies,” Malcolm Fraser, the former prime minister of Australia worries that the Canberra’s dependence on the United States will eventually bring the nation into a direct conflict with China. His words echo those of Georgetown University professor Amitai Etzioni in and article he wrote for the Diplomat on Jan. 20.

Australia has always been strategically dependent on other great powers since gaining independence in 1901. It relied on the United Kingdom until World War II and then transfered that dependence to the United States afterwards. The relationship grew stronger with the signing of the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty in 1951. Fraser said that the treaty does not require the US to defend Australia, only nneding to “consult” it in case of an attack.

In Fraser’s book, he describes how Australia’s blind faith in the UK before World War II left the country unprepared for war. He then goes on to say that currently many feel more vulnerable because of the country’s dependence on the United States. What Fraser and many Australian leaders fears most is that the United States will get Australia involved in a coflict [sic] not of its own making. “Australia effectively ceded to America the ability to decide when Australia goes to war,” said Fraser.

Full article: US a dangerous ally: former Australia PM (Want China Times)

One response to “US a dangerous ally: former Australia PM

  1. Because America has pine gap and is concerned with China and its military development requires Australia, as the main ally in SE Asia, the cultural connection has trust woven within this entwined relationship, although America has Japan it has not the same cultural bond, the size of Australia makes a stronger fortress than the geographical size and location of Japan, true Australia has a cultural cringe and thus has this fear of being the outsider to the SE, the cringe is amplified to a unwarranted extent, owing to the SE countries having at present manifold problems of uncertainty within its own borders.